Upcoming Events
  • 8/12 BACK TO SCHOOL
  • HAVE A GOOD SUMMER!
The Online Source for J.W. Mitchell High School News

The Hoofbeat

The Hoofbeat

The Hoofbeat

Print Edition

Breaking the burnout cycle

Students reveal their methods to avoid academic burnout during the second half of the school year.
+Lucy+Breitenbach+%28%E2%80%9824%29+reads+a+book+after+completing+her+homework.+%E2%80%9CI+like+reading+books+because+they+help+open+my+perspective+and+experience+new+places+without+the+cost+of+traveling%2C%E2%80%9D+she+said.+
Lucy Breitenbach (‘24) reads a book after completing her homework. “I like reading books because they help open my perspective and experience new places without the cost of traveling,” she said.

  As school continues and second semester  assignments start to pile up, students are beginning to find the work overwhelming and mentally exhausting. According to Psychcentral.com, “Burnout refers to the feeling of mental and physical exhaustion due to prolonged stress, such as at work.” Olivia Wheatcraft (’25) faces the effects of Burnout when juggling classes and an extensive list of extracurriculars. 

   “I’m in DE Comp, DE Math, AP Chem and APUSH, Band and Yearbook. I’m also founder and president of WISTEM (Women in Stem), Secretary of Interact, in Model UN, Mu Alpha Theta, Hosa, Rho Kappa, NHS, and an outreach officer of GEM (Global Empowerment Movement Club)” Wheatcraft said.

   Psychcentral.com published an in-depth article about the effects of burnout, stating that it is most commonly associated with work, school, and other stressful environments. It most prominently results in a lack of motivation to do work and self-dismissal of personal needs like sleep, exercise, and eating. 

   “Sometimes finding the motivation to get up and do the work is really hard,” Wheatcraft also said.

   Here, the average student gets home after three o’clock because 7th period ends at 2:52 PM. Most students have around two to three hours of work a night, leaving them only a few hours to relax and eat dinner or hang out with friends. This estimate doesn’t even include hours that have to be dedicated to community service or club events. Rebecca Youssef (’25) knows this schedule all too well, being in mostly AP classes and Mu Alpha Theta, HOSA, and Science NHS.

   “I have about two to three hours of homework every single night,” Youssef said. 

   Eating healthy and maintaining a decent sleep schedule can also provide students with a great deal of much-needed energy so they’re ready to take on their assignments with determination. Lucy Breitenbach is the class of 2024 Outstanding Senior and President of Model UN, among other accomplishments. On top of her academic dedication, she also balances a job as an assistant soccer coach on weekends.

   “I work out, eat healthy, journal, and make sure to do activities I enjoy. I also make sure to get at least eight hours of sleep a night,” Breitenbach said.  

   Having a hobby, working out, journaling, and maintaining a healthy social life are all effective ways that students relieve the stress that can be caused by school.  

   “I hang out with my friends, it makes me feel relaxed. Being with them makes me feel fulfilled and I enjoy it a lot when I have the time to go out.” Wheatcraft said.

   Organizing a complicated work schedule can be a difficult task, and many students use electronic calendars on their phones because it will notify them when assignments and tests are coming up and they can better plan their homework and study schedules. 

   Victoria Tubens (’26) is in various clubs, including Model UN and Spanish Honors Society.

   “I have a physical planner and one on my phone that notifies me whenever I have assignments to turn in,” Tubens said. 

   Using a calendar or to-do list can greatly assist a student in need of a more organized schedule. This in turn can help them stay on top of their assignments so they get done on time. The cycle of burnout students face can be detrimental to their grades, so taking measures to prevent it from happening early on can be extremely helpful to maintaining a healthy mindset when school is in session.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Hoofbeat
$175
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of J.W. Mitchell High School. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
About the Contributor
Donate to The Hoofbeat
$175
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Hoofbeat Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *